Pasture has the potential to provide
1. The horses nutrition
2. A Safe exercise area
Potentials rarely achieved, often neglected

All information given here is believed to be correct but the author cannot be responsible for any consequences of it's use.

Pasture Management
for
Horses

by Denis Lindsell
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Weeds

Weed Control

Ragwort

Bracken

Marestails

Nettles

Docks

Chickweed

Buttercups

Plantains

Creeping Thistle

Spear Thistle

Dandelion

St. Johns Wort

 


 

Creeping Buttercup - Ranunculaceae repens


Growth Habit

Perennial, creeping stolons can enable the plant to entirely cover areas of land.

Encouraged by

Hard grazing or physical damage in early Spring, particularly on wet soils

Physical Control

No effective physical control other than good paddock management, control of grazing, encouraging good grass growth.

Chemical Control

MCPA can be effective if there is also grass present to compete with the weed. Spot application of Glysophate will control the weed but a total kill and effective re-seeding will be necessary to avoid re-establishment of the buttercups.

Toxicity

Low - the plant's sap is an irritant which can cause inflamationblistering of the horses skin and mucous membranes. Further irritation or damage to the digestive system is possible. However the horse will normally aviod eating buttercups due to their bitter taste.
The irritant contents of the plant's sap is rendered inactive by drying, therefore the weed is not a risk in hay.


Creeping Buttercup
Creeping Buttercup